‘You throw like a girl!’ ‘MythBusters’ puts the classic insult to the test.

Is the myth true?

We’ve been culturally trained to believe that throwing a ball is a boy’s game and not a girl’s game.


“You throw like a girl!”

“You play like a girl!”

“You run like a girl!”

“You [insert random verb] like a girl.” Doing things “like a girl” has historically been considered an insult and a way to express that girls are inferior to boys. Pop culture sure hasn’t helped.

Thanks for nothing, “Sandlot”!

Boys must actually be better at throwing balls then, right?

The hit show “MythBusters” decided to find out. They wanted to see if there’s a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball.

Image by “MythBusters.”

They put eight people in four different age groups up against each other to analyze their throws. They had the subjects throw with their dominant arm first. Then they had them use their non-dominant arm because, without practice or training of any sort, it’s sort of like you’re throwing for the first time. This is when the real results showed.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

A different test showed that, yes, there is a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball: Men throw more horizontally, and women throw more vertically.

Boys and girls throw differently, but that doesn’t mean boys are better at throwing.

The myth that throwing like a girl is a lesser thing does not hold up. GOODBYE, MYTH.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

Mo’ne Davis is like, “duh.”

Watch the segment for all of the science-y, ball-throwing goodness:

Original video by “MythBusters.” It’s been great to see a shift in the way girls are being portrayed in the media lately with campaigns like #LikeAGirl that help start conversations about girls’ self-confidence and encouraging them to be proud of who they are. Girls rock. The end.

‘You throw like a girl!’ ‘MythBusters’ puts the classic insult to the test.

Is the myth true?

We’ve been culturally trained to believe that throwing a ball is a boy’s game and not a girl’s game.


“You throw like a girl!”

“You play like a girl!”

“You run like a girl!”

“You [insert random verb] like a girl.” Doing things “like a girl” has historically been considered an insult and a way to express that girls are inferior to boys. Pop culture sure hasn’t helped.

Thanks for nothing, “Sandlot”!

Boys must actually be better at throwing balls then, right?

The hit show “MythBusters” decided to find out. They wanted to see if there’s a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball.

Image by “MythBusters.”

They put eight people in four different age groups up against each other to analyze their throws. They had the subjects throw with their dominant arm first. Then they had them use their non-dominant arm because, without practice or training of any sort, it’s sort of like you’re throwing for the first time. This is when the real results showed.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

A different test showed that, yes, there is a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball: Men throw more horizontally, and women throw more vertically.

Boys and girls throw differently, but that doesn’t mean boys are better at throwing.

The myth that throwing like a girl is a lesser thing does not hold up. GOODBYE, MYTH.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

Mo’ne Davis is like, “duh.”

Watch the segment for all of the science-y, ball-throwing goodness:

Original video by “MythBusters.” It’s been great to see a shift in the way girls are being portrayed in the media lately with campaigns like #LikeAGirl that help start conversations about girls’ self-confidence and encouraging them to be proud of who they are. Girls rock. The end.

‘You throw like a girl!’ ‘MythBusters’ puts the classic insult to the test.

Is the myth true?

We’ve been culturally trained to believe that throwing a ball is a boy’s game and not a girl’s game.


“You throw like a girl!”

“You play like a girl!”

“You run like a girl!”

“You [insert random verb] like a girl.” Doing things “like a girl” has historically been considered an insult and a way to express that girls are inferior to boys. Pop culture sure hasn’t helped.

Thanks for nothing, “Sandlot”!

Boys must actually be better at throwing balls then, right?

The hit show “MythBusters” decided to find out. They wanted to see if there’s a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball.

Image by “MythBusters.”

They put eight people in four different age groups up against each other to analyze their throws. They had the subjects throw with their dominant arm first. Then they had them use their non-dominant arm because, without practice or training of any sort, it’s sort of like you’re throwing for the first time. This is when the real results showed.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

A different test showed that, yes, there is a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball: Men throw more horizontally, and women throw more vertically.

Boys and girls throw differently, but that doesn’t mean boys are better at throwing.

The myth that throwing like a girl is a lesser thing does not hold up. GOODBYE, MYTH.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

Mo’ne Davis is like, “duh.”

Watch the segment for all of the science-y, ball-throwing goodness:

Original video by “MythBusters.” It’s been great to see a shift in the way girls are being portrayed in the media lately with campaigns like #LikeAGirl that help start conversations about girls’ self-confidence and encouraging them to be proud of who they are. Girls rock. The end.

‘You throw like a girl!’ ‘MythBusters’ puts the classic insult to the test.

Is the myth true?

We’ve been culturally trained to believe that throwing a ball is a boy’s game and not a girl’s game.


“You throw like a girl!”

“You play like a girl!”

“You run like a girl!”

“You [insert random verb] like a girl.” Doing things “like a girl” has historically been considered an insult and a way to express that girls are inferior to boys. Pop culture sure hasn’t helped.

Thanks for nothing, “Sandlot”!

Boys must actually be better at throwing balls then, right?

The hit show “MythBusters” decided to find out. They wanted to see if there’s a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball.

Image by “MythBusters.”

They put eight people in four different age groups up against each other to analyze their throws. They had the subjects throw with their dominant arm first. Then they had them use their non-dominant arm because, without practice or training of any sort, it’s sort of like you’re throwing for the first time. This is when the real results showed.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

When using their non-dominant arm with zero training, the guys were more accurate, but the girls threw faster.

A different test showed that, yes, there is a distinct difference in the way a guy throws a ball versus the way a girl throws a ball: Men throw more horizontally, and women throw more vertically.

Boys and girls throw differently, but that doesn’t mean boys are better at throwing.

The myth that throwing like a girl is a lesser thing does not hold up. GOODBYE, MYTH.

GIF by “MythBusters.”

Mo’ne Davis is like, “duh.”

Watch the segment for all of the science-y, ball-throwing goodness:

Original video by “MythBusters.” It’s been great to see a shift in the way girls are being portrayed in the media lately with campaigns like #LikeAGirl that help start conversations about girls’ self-confidence and encouraging them to be proud of who they are. Girls rock. The end.

Her story of addiction is pretty common, but her recovery depended on how she told that story.

There are two stories of Jo’s addiction. Only one is actually helpful.

Jo Harvey used to tell her story of addiction in a dark and messy way.

It started when Jo was 7. On a hiking trip, she was given her first drink. She liked the taste, and by the time she was 12, she had experimented with more alcohol and other drugs. In high school, she was introduced to cocaine. She became a party girl, one who didn’t remember most wild nights and spiraled into a deep addiction to drugs and alcohol.

Eventually, she gave up the drugs and went in for treatment. In the years since, Jo not only has been sober, but she’s dedicated her life to helping others through similar struggles. Today, Jo is completing a doctorate while working to develop alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs for her university.

Now she tells her story as the story of a struggle that saved her.

The difference between those two stories isn’t in the facts of her life — those didn’t change. But how she tells the story now is radically different because it is no longer dripping with guilt and shame. Jo used to be ashamed that she wasn’t the perfect all-American girl that her good grades and pretty appearance led people to believe. She was ashamed that she had succumbed to addiction and that she was struggling with substance abuse. And that guilt and shame shaped how she lived her life.

Why did Jo carry so much guilt and shame around her addiction? Well one factor may have been her gender.

Laura Blum, Nancy Nielsen, and Joseph Riggs prepared a review for the American Medical Association’s Council on Scientific Affairs. In it, they describe the societal attitudes about alcoholism and women as well as their unique barriers to treatment.

  • Women who drink excessively are stigmatized as “generally and sexually immoral.” That stigma can be internalized by friends, family, health care providers, and even women themselves, who become more likely to deny their alcohol abuse.
  • This leads to an “under-recognition of drinking problems in women until they have reached an advanced stage. Fear of stigmatization may lead women to deny that they are suffering from a medical condition, to hide their drinking, and to drink alone.”

GIF via TEDx.

Jo now believes that the key to recovery comes down to the stories we tell.

In order to heal, she had to shake the shame, stigma, and fear to come out on the other side and share her true story: one of hurt and pain, sure, but also of healing and strength. Today, she has this to say about people who are struggling with addiction:

“They matter and are worth fighting for. Even the deepest wounds can heal, and at any moment we can let go of our shame and find peace.”

Watch Jo share her empowering story in her own words:

The TEDx University of Nevada talk was delivered by Jo Harvey. If you’d like to learn more, take a deeper dive into the research reviews completed for the American Medical Association, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the National Institutes for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. For more information on policies, resources, and treatment options, read the brief put together by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Her story of addiction is pretty common, but her recovery depended on how she told that story.

There are two stories of Jo’s addiction. Only one is actually helpful.

Jo Harvey used to tell her story of addiction in a dark and messy way.

It started when Jo was 7. On a hiking trip, she was given her first drink. She liked the taste, and by the time she was 12, she had experimented with more alcohol and other drugs. In high school, she was introduced to cocaine. She became a party girl, one who didn’t remember most wild nights and spiraled into a deep addiction to drugs and alcohol.

Eventually, she gave up the drugs and went in for treatment. In the years since, Jo not only has been sober, but she’s dedicated her life to helping others through similar struggles. Today, Jo is completing a doctorate while working to develop alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs for her university.

Now she tells her story as the story of a struggle that saved her.

The difference between those two stories isn’t in the facts of her life — those didn’t change. But how she tells the story now is radically different because it is no longer dripping with guilt and shame. Jo used to be ashamed that she wasn’t the perfect all-American girl that her good grades and pretty appearance led people to believe. She was ashamed that she had succumbed to addiction and that she was struggling with substance abuse. And that guilt and shame shaped how she lived her life.

Why did Jo carry so much guilt and shame around her addiction? Well one factor may have been her gender.

Laura Blum, Nancy Nielsen, and Joseph Riggs prepared a review for the American Medical Association’s Council on Scientific Affairs. In it, they describe the societal attitudes about alcoholism and women as well as their unique barriers to treatment.

  • Women who drink excessively are stigmatized as “generally and sexually immoral.” That stigma can be internalized by friends, family, health care providers, and even women themselves, who become more likely to deny their alcohol abuse.
  • This leads to an “under-recognition of drinking problems in women until they have reached an advanced stage. Fear of stigmatization may lead women to deny that they are suffering from a medical condition, to hide their drinking, and to drink alone.”

GIF via TEDx.

Jo now believes that the key to recovery comes down to the stories we tell.

In order to heal, she had to shake the shame, stigma, and fear to come out on the other side and share her true story: one of hurt and pain, sure, but also of healing and strength. Today, she has this to say about people who are struggling with addiction:

“They matter and are worth fighting for. Even the deepest wounds can heal, and at any moment we can let go of our shame and find peace.”

Watch Jo share her empowering story in her own words:

The TEDx University of Nevada talk was delivered by Jo Harvey. If you’d like to learn more, take a deeper dive into the research reviews completed for the American Medical Association, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the National Institutes for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. For more information on policies, resources, and treatment options, read the brief put together by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Her story of addiction is pretty common, but her recovery depended on how she told that story.

There are two stories of Jo’s addiction. Only one is actually helpful.

Jo Harvey used to tell her story of addiction in a dark and messy way.

It started when Jo was 7. On a hiking trip, she was given her first drink. She liked the taste, and by the time she was 12, she had experimented with more alcohol and other drugs. In high school, she was introduced to cocaine. She became a party girl, one who didn’t remember most wild nights and spiraled into a deep addiction to drugs and alcohol.

Eventually, she gave up the drugs and went in for treatment. In the years since, Jo not only has been sober, but she’s dedicated her life to helping others through similar struggles. Today, Jo is completing a doctorate while working to develop alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs for her university.

Now she tells her story as the story of a struggle that saved her.

The difference between those two stories isn’t in the facts of her life — those didn’t change. But how she tells the story now is radically different because it is no longer dripping with guilt and shame. Jo used to be ashamed that she wasn’t the perfect all-American girl that her good grades and pretty appearance led people to believe. She was ashamed that she had succumbed to addiction and that she was struggling with substance abuse. And that guilt and shame shaped how she lived her life.

Why did Jo carry so much guilt and shame around her addiction? Well one factor may have been her gender.

Laura Blum, Nancy Nielsen, and Joseph Riggs prepared a review for the American Medical Association’s Council on Scientific Affairs. In it, they describe the societal attitudes about alcoholism and women as well as their unique barriers to treatment.

  • Women who drink excessively are stigmatized as “generally and sexually immoral.” That stigma can be internalized by friends, family, health care providers, and even women themselves, who become more likely to deny their alcohol abuse.
  • This leads to an “under-recognition of drinking problems in women until they have reached an advanced stage. Fear of stigmatization may lead women to deny that they are suffering from a medical condition, to hide their drinking, and to drink alone.”

GIF via TEDx.

Jo now believes that the key to recovery comes down to the stories we tell.

In order to heal, she had to shake the shame, stigma, and fear to come out on the other side and share her true story: one of hurt and pain, sure, but also of healing and strength. Today, she has this to say about people who are struggling with addiction:

“They matter and are worth fighting for. Even the deepest wounds can heal, and at any moment we can let go of our shame and find peace.”

Watch Jo share her empowering story in her own words:

The TEDx University of Nevada talk was delivered by Jo Harvey. If you’d like to learn more, take a deeper dive into the research reviews completed for the American Medical Association, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the National Institutes for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. For more information on policies, resources, and treatment options, read the brief put together by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Her story of addiction is pretty common, but her recovery depended on how she told that story.

There are two stories of Jo’s addiction. Only one is actually helpful.

Jo Harvey used to tell her story of addiction in a dark and messy way.

It started when Jo was 7. On a hiking trip, she was given her first drink. She liked the taste, and by the time she was 12, she had experimented with more alcohol and other drugs. In high school, she was introduced to cocaine. She became a party girl, one who didn’t remember most wild nights and spiraled into a deep addiction to drugs and alcohol.

Eventually, she gave up the drugs and went in for treatment. In the years since, Jo not only has been sober, but she’s dedicated her life to helping others through similar struggles. Today, Jo is completing a doctorate while working to develop alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs for her university.

Now she tells her story as the story of a struggle that saved her.

The difference between those two stories isn’t in the facts of her life — those didn’t change. But how she tells the story now is radically different because it is no longer dripping with guilt and shame. Jo used to be ashamed that she wasn’t the perfect all-American girl that her good grades and pretty appearance led people to believe. She was ashamed that she had succumbed to addiction and that she was struggling with substance abuse. And that guilt and shame shaped how she lived her life.

Why did Jo carry so much guilt and shame around her addiction? Well one factor may have been her gender.

Laura Blum, Nancy Nielsen, and Joseph Riggs prepared a review for the American Medical Association’s Council on Scientific Affairs. In it, they describe the societal attitudes about alcoholism and women as well as their unique barriers to treatment.

  • Women who drink excessively are stigmatized as “generally and sexually immoral.” That stigma can be internalized by friends, family, health care providers, and even women themselves, who become more likely to deny their alcohol abuse.
  • This leads to an “under-recognition of drinking problems in women until they have reached an advanced stage. Fear of stigmatization may lead women to deny that they are suffering from a medical condition, to hide their drinking, and to drink alone.”

GIF via TEDx.

Jo now believes that the key to recovery comes down to the stories we tell.

In order to heal, she had to shake the shame, stigma, and fear to come out on the other side and share her true story: one of hurt and pain, sure, but also of healing and strength. Today, she has this to say about people who are struggling with addiction:

“They matter and are worth fighting for. Even the deepest wounds can heal, and at any moment we can let go of our shame and find peace.”

Watch Jo share her empowering story in her own words:

The TEDx University of Nevada talk was delivered by Jo Harvey. If you’d like to learn more, take a deeper dive into the research reviews completed for the American Medical Association, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the National Institutes for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. For more information on policies, resources, and treatment options, read the brief put together by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Here are 3 of the newest TV shows to add more diversity to American entertainment.

Must-see TV.

Last season’s “Empire,” “Sleepy Hollow,” and “How to Get Away With Murder” showed television executives that people of color not only can lead interesting programming, but they can lead programming that interests white people as well. Now, there is a new crop of minority-led programming that will greet us this fall. Here are some of the most promising offerings.

Because I’m writing this, I can start off with the show I am most excited about:

“Quantico”

Plot summary: A diverse group of recruits has arrived at the FBI Quantico Base for training. They are the best, the brightest, and the most vetted, so it seems impossible that one of them is suspected of masterminding the biggest attack on New York City since 9/11.

The great thing about this show is that it’s led by an entertainment veteran (and if you watch Bollywood movies, you know who she is). Actress and former Miss World India Priyanka Chopra is so famous internationally that her nearly 10 million Twitter followers
made the news of “Quantico” and her character Alex Parrish trend worldwide on Twitter. Add “Mentalist” and “NCIS: Los Angeles” veteran Aunjanue Ellis as Alex Parrish’s handler, and you have not only a minority-led show, but a badass-woman-led show as well.

“The Frankenstein Code”

Plot summary: A modern reimagining of the Mary Shelley classic about a man brought back to life by two scientists playing god.

Joining Robert Kazinsky (who you may remember from “True Blood”) in the lead role as the most attractive Frankenstein to ever exist (probably) are his on-screen creators, actor Adhir Kalyan (previously known as David Spade’s assistant “Rules of Engagement” — quite a promotion) and actress Dilshad Vadsaria (who you may recognize as Nolan Ross’s ex from the recently cancelled “Revenge”). The Frankenstein story hinges on the relationship between monster and creator, so it’ll be interesting to see how the story plays out in a modern context.

“Rosewood”

Plot summary: Meet Dr. Beaumont Rosewood Jr., the most brilliant private pathologist in Miami, who uses his wildly sophisticated autopsy lab to perform for-hire autopsies to uncover clues that the Miami Police Department can’t see. His new partner in crime is Detective Villa, a Miami PD detective with attitude and demons to spare.

Among the new crop of police procedurals coming at us this fall is this new one starring Morris Chestnut, formerly of “Nurse Jackie.” It’s so refreshing to see that in this crime show, the sidekick is a minority as well as the lead. Agent Villa is played by newcomer Jaina Lee Ortiz, and their chemistry reminds me of ABC’s “Castle.” Let’s hope this one lasts multiple seasons as well!


The television landscape is changing for the better. With new offerings like these three, I’m excited for the future.

An Upworthy original. All plot summaries have been pulled from the television shows’ YouTube descriptions.

Here are 3 of the newest TV shows to add more diversity to American entertainment.

Must-see TV.

Last season’s “Empire,” “Sleepy Hollow,” and “How to Get Away With Murder” showed television executives that people of color not only can lead interesting programming, but they can lead programming that interests white people as well. Now, there is a new crop of minority-led programming that will greet us this fall. Here are some of the most promising offerings.

Because I’m writing this, I can start off with the show I am most excited about:

“Quantico”

Plot summary: A diverse group of recruits has arrived at the FBI Quantico Base for training. They are the best, the brightest, and the most vetted, so it seems impossible that one of them is suspected of masterminding the biggest attack on New York City since 9/11.

The great thing about this show is that it’s led by an entertainment veteran (and if you watch Bollywood movies, you know who she is). Actress and former Miss World India Priyanka Chopra is so famous internationally that her nearly 10 million Twitter followers
made the news of “Quantico” and her character Alex Parrish trend worldwide on Twitter. Add “Mentalist” and “NCIS: Los Angeles” veteran Aunjanue Ellis as Alex Parrish’s handler, and you have not only a minority-led show, but a badass-woman-led show as well.

“The Frankenstein Code”

Plot summary: A modern reimagining of the Mary Shelley classic about a man brought back to life by two scientists playing god.

Joining Robert Kazinsky (who you may remember from “True Blood”) in the lead role as the most attractive Frankenstein to ever exist (probably) are his on-screen creators, actor Adhir Kalyan (previously known as David Spade’s assistant “Rules of Engagement” — quite a promotion) and actress Dilshad Vadsaria (who you may recognize as Nolan Ross’s ex from the recently cancelled “Revenge”). The Frankenstein story hinges on the relationship between monster and creator, so it’ll be interesting to see how the story plays out in a modern context.

“Rosewood”

Plot summary: Meet Dr. Beaumont Rosewood Jr., the most brilliant private pathologist in Miami, who uses his wildly sophisticated autopsy lab to perform for-hire autopsies to uncover clues that the Miami Police Department can’t see. His new partner in crime is Detective Villa, a Miami PD detective with attitude and demons to spare.

Among the new crop of police procedurals coming at us this fall is this new one starring Morris Chestnut, formerly of “Nurse Jackie.” It’s so refreshing to see that in this crime show, the sidekick is a minority as well as the lead. Agent Villa is played by newcomer Jaina Lee Ortiz, and their chemistry reminds me of ABC’s “Castle.” Let’s hope this one lasts multiple seasons as well!


The television landscape is changing for the better. With new offerings like these three, I’m excited for the future.

An Upworthy original. All plot summaries have been pulled from the television shows’ YouTube descriptions.

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