All posts by Source

10 years after Dr. Qin came to town, one Chinese village has been transformed.

I think she’s pretty popular with the locals.

10 years ago, the Chinese village of Ci Fu was hurtin’.

A very poor area with bad roads, no medical care, and not a single computer — it was the perfect recipe for a bad situation in Ci Fu, a village that nearly 2,000 people call home.

Hello, Ci Fu. Images by D J Clark.

Qin Zanchun moved there for a reason.

A struggling village doesn’t seem like the #1 pick for a recent graduate, but it’s where Qin decided she needed to go.

Hello, Qin Zanchun.

As explained in a beautiful video by D J Clark, Qin and the people of Ci Fu had something in common.

Like many in the village, Qin grew up in poor health and was constantly sick as a kid. She knows the struggle.

So she did something about it. She went to medical school, got her degree, and instead of taking a job in an established area with money to follow, she showed up in Ci Fu.

She became the village’s only doctor.

It wasn’t a glamorous life, you can say that much. She walked long distances on terrible roads every day to care for the villagers — many of them elderly.
Her salary for one month was just 30 yuan, about $4.83 … for an entire month!

But she stuck with it and kept going because it was important to her.

10 years later, Ci Fu is a much different place.

A much-improved place! The village now has concrete roads that connect it to more places, rural health insurance, and computers. And it’s a healthier community overall. Dr. Qin has a new health center too (and is definitely getting paid more).

It’s a heartwarming tale of helping those in need in a place that surely would have continued to struggle.
You can’t make progress if you’re not healthy.

Go, Dr. Qin!

Beautiful original video from D J Clark.

10 years after Dr. Qin came to town, one Chinese village has been transformed.

I think she’s pretty popular with the locals.

10 years ago, the Chinese village of Ci Fu was hurtin’.

A very poor area with bad roads, no medical care, and not a single computer — it was the perfect recipe for a bad situation in Ci Fu, a village that nearly 2,000 people call home.

Hello, Ci Fu. Images by D J Clark.

Qin Zanchun moved there for a reason.

A struggling village doesn’t seem like the #1 pick for a recent graduate, but it’s where Qin decided she needed to go.

Hello, Qin Zanchun.

As explained in a beautiful video by D J Clark, Qin and the people of Ci Fu had something in common.

Like many in the village, Qin grew up in poor health and was constantly sick as a kid. She knows the struggle.

So she did something about it. She went to medical school, got her degree, and instead of taking a job in an established area with money to follow, she showed up in Ci Fu.

She became the village’s only doctor.

It wasn’t a glamorous life, you can say that much. She walked long distances on terrible roads every day to care for the villagers — many of them elderly.
Her salary for one month was just 30 yuan, about $4.83 … for an entire month!

But she stuck with it and kept going because it was important to her.

10 years later, Ci Fu is a much different place.

A much-improved place! The village now has concrete roads that connect it to more places, rural health insurance, and computers. And it’s a healthier community overall. Dr. Qin has a new health center too (and is definitely getting paid more).

It’s a heartwarming tale of helping those in need in a place that surely would have continued to struggle.
You can’t make progress if you’re not healthy.

Go, Dr. Qin!

Beautiful original video from D J Clark.

A cool animation by a film student makes a great point about fear.

There’s a silver lining.

Vancouver Film School student Nata Metlukh made one of the coolest animations I’ve seen lately. And it’s about fear.

<span class=”redactor-invisible-space”></span>

We all face fear. Fear of critters, fear of heights, fear of losing our jobs, fear of losing small spaces, fear of heartbreaks.

Images by Nata Metlukh.

Often, we categorize fear as a negative aspect of our lives. And it’s true: Fear can have bad consequences for us. About 3.3 million American adults suffer from anxiety.

According to PsychCentral:

“Without any provocation at all, they feel the same emotional and physical sensations they would if their lives were in jeopardy. … In severe cases, people can end up avoiding social contact and shunning everyday activities like driving and shopping, even leaving the house.”

Severe anxiety is like living with overwhelming fear and dread that stops you from functioning normally day-to-day. That’s not a fun way to live. At all. In these cases, fear stops us from living.

But we often forget to look at the positive side of fear.

Did you know fear is an evolutionary emotion that can help us survive?

Studies have shown that fear is a natural part of human evolution that has helped us survive for centuries. For example, a recent study from Columbia University implies that humans evolved to fear spiders over millions of years, which helps protect us from these venomous critters. Other studies suggest that a fear of snakes — which can be cool, but can also kill us! — was an evolutionary trait as well.

Fear alerts us that our body is under siege, and it allows us to respond in ways that protect us. For example, a fear of cars can make us cautious when we go through a crosswalk.

Not having that fear might land us in unfortunate situations.

So remember, fear isn’t always the bad guy.

Because sometimes, it might just save your life.

And when it does, you’ll be thankful.

Nata Metlukh directed and animated this delightful video at Vancouver Film School. You can follow her on Facebook and visit her website if you want to stay updated on her next bits of awesomeness.

A cool animation by a film student makes a great point about fear.

There’s a silver lining.

Vancouver Film School student Nata Metlukh made one of the coolest animations I’ve seen lately. And it’s about fear.

<span class=”redactor-invisible-space”></span>

We all face fear. Fear of critters, fear of heights, fear of losing our jobs, fear of losing small spaces, fear of heartbreaks.

Images by Nata Metlukh.

Often, we categorize fear as a negative aspect of our lives. And it’s true: Fear can have bad consequences for us. About 3.3 million American adults suffer from anxiety.

According to PsychCentral:

“Without any provocation at all, they feel the same emotional and physical sensations they would if their lives were in jeopardy. … In severe cases, people can end up avoiding social contact and shunning everyday activities like driving and shopping, even leaving the house.”

Severe anxiety is like living with overwhelming fear and dread that stops you from functioning normally day-to-day. That’s not a fun way to live. At all. In these cases, fear stops us from living.

But we often forget to look at the positive side of fear.

Did you know fear is an evolutionary emotion that can help us survive?

Studies have shown that fear is a natural part of human evolution that has helped us survive for centuries. For example, a recent study from Columbia University implies that humans evolved to fear spiders over millions of years, which helps protect us from these venomous critters. Other studies suggest that a fear of snakes — which can be cool, but can also kill us! — was an evolutionary trait as well.

Fear alerts us that our body is under siege, and it allows us to respond in ways that protect us. For example, a fear of cars can make us cautious when we go through a crosswalk.

Not having that fear might land us in unfortunate situations.

So remember, fear isn’t always the bad guy.

Because sometimes, it might just save your life.

And when it does, you’ll be thankful.

Nata Metlukh directed and animated this delightful video at Vancouver Film School. You can follow her on Facebook and visit her website if you want to stay updated on her next bits of awesomeness.

A cool animation by a film student makes a great point about fear.

There’s a silver lining.

Vancouver Film School student Nata Metlukh made one of the coolest animations I’ve seen lately. And it’s about fear.

<span class=”redactor-invisible-space”></span>

We all face fear. Fear of critters, fear of heights, fear of losing our jobs, fear of losing small spaces, fear of heartbreaks.

Images by Nata Metlukh.

Often, we categorize fear as a negative aspect of our lives. And it’s true: Fear can have bad consequences for us. About 3.3 million American adults suffer from anxiety.

According to PsychCentral:

“Without any provocation at all, they feel the same emotional and physical sensations they would if their lives were in jeopardy. … In severe cases, people can end up avoiding social contact and shunning everyday activities like driving and shopping, even leaving the house.”

Severe anxiety is like living with overwhelming fear and dread that stops you from functioning normally day-to-day. That’s not a fun way to live. At all. In these cases, fear stops us from living.

But we often forget to look at the positive side of fear.

Did you know fear is an evolutionary emotion that can help us survive?

Studies have shown that fear is a natural part of human evolution that has helped us survive for centuries. For example, a recent study from Columbia University implies that humans evolved to fear spiders over millions of years, which helps protect us from these venomous critters. Other studies suggest that a fear of snakes — which can be cool, but can also kill us! — was an evolutionary trait as well.

Fear alerts us that our body is under siege, and it allows us to respond in ways that protect us. For example, a fear of cars can make us cautious when we go through a crosswalk.

Not having that fear might land us in unfortunate situations.

So remember, fear isn’t always the bad guy.

Because sometimes, it might just save your life.

And when it does, you’ll be thankful.

Nata Metlukh directed and animated this delightful video at Vancouver Film School. You can follow her on Facebook and visit her website if you want to stay updated on her next bits of awesomeness.

A cool animation by a film student makes a great point about fear.

There’s a silver lining.

Vancouver Film School student Nata Metlukh made one of the coolest animations I’ve seen lately. And it’s about fear.

<span class=”redactor-invisible-space”></span>

We all face fear. Fear of critters, fear of heights, fear of losing our jobs, fear of losing small spaces, fear of heartbreaks.

Images by Nata Metlukh.

Often, we categorize fear as a negative aspect of our lives. And it’s true: Fear can have bad consequences for us. About 3.3 million American adults suffer from anxiety.

According to PsychCentral:

“Without any provocation at all, they feel the same emotional and physical sensations they would if their lives were in jeopardy. … In severe cases, people can end up avoiding social contact and shunning everyday activities like driving and shopping, even leaving the house.”

Severe anxiety is like living with overwhelming fear and dread that stops you from functioning normally day-to-day. That’s not a fun way to live. At all. In these cases, fear stops us from living.

But we often forget to look at the positive side of fear.

Did you know fear is an evolutionary emotion that can help us survive?

Studies have shown that fear is a natural part of human evolution that has helped us survive for centuries. For example, a recent study from Columbia University implies that humans evolved to fear spiders over millions of years, which helps protect us from these venomous critters. Other studies suggest that a fear of snakes — which can be cool, but can also kill us! — was an evolutionary trait as well.

Fear alerts us that our body is under siege, and it allows us to respond in ways that protect us. For example, a fear of cars can make us cautious when we go through a crosswalk.

Not having that fear might land us in unfortunate situations.

So remember, fear isn’t always the bad guy.

Because sometimes, it might just save your life.

And when it does, you’ll be thankful.

Nata Metlukh directed and animated this delightful video at Vancouver Film School. You can follow her on Facebook and visit her website if you want to stay updated on her next bits of awesomeness.

A ‘Daily Show’ correspondent asks a millionaire about inequality and gets an unexpected response.

Wealth inequality has never been funnier.

Inequality has gotten worse than you think.

An investigation by Hasan Minhaj of “The Daily Show” shows that the problem isn’t just your classic case of “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.”

As much as we hear about wealth inequality these days, one disparity remains mostly ignored: the gap between the wealthy and the ridiculously wealthy.

Minhaj spoke to Richard Reeves, an economist with the Brookings Institute, who painted a dark picture:

In the last two, three decades, we've seen a really striking increase in wealth inequality in America. This new study shows that within the top 1%, there is very, very wide inequality.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

The study Reeves refers to points to the growing wealth of the top 10th of the top 1%:

The rise of wealth inequality is almost entirely due to the rise of the top 0.1% wealth share, from 7% in 1979 to 22% in 2012 — a level almost as high as in 1929. The bottom 90% wealth share first increased up to the mid-1980s and then steadily declined.”

And no one’s paid any attention.

Between the cries of the 45.3 million people in poverty and a dwindling middle class in every state, the voice of the average millionaire is all but drowned out.

They need our help, right?

But not all millionaires are worried about growing inequality in the top 1%.

In his search for a concerned millionaire, Minhaj met Morris Pearl, a retired investment banking director and member of an organization called The Patriotic Millionaires. Minhaj was baffled by what Pearl had to say:

I do not need more money.

What about trickle-down economics?

Trickle-down theory was popularized under Ronald Reagan’s presidency. The idea was that clearing a path for the rich to make more money would spur more private investment, which would lead to more jobs and higher wages for all workers.

Reagan put trickle-down theory into practice in two basic ways: by lowering taxes for the wealthy and by freezing wages for the poor.

In 1981, he cut the top marginal income tax rate — which only applies to the highest-income households — from 70% to 50%. Then in 1986, he more than doubled-down by slashing the rate to 28%. (The current rate is 39.6%.) And under Reagan’s leadership, the minimum wage was frozen, even as costs of living were rising.

Pearl and other so-called Patriotic Millionaires think top one-percenters like themselves should pay more taxes.

Not only that, they believe raising the minimum wage is critical to reducing inequality.

OK, maybe not everyone — including millionaires — are convinced that giving more money to the rich will fix the economy. So why do our policies do just the opposite?

Original video by “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.” Follow Hasan Minhaj on Twitter.

A ‘Daily Show’ correspondent asks a millionaire about inequality and gets an unexpected response.

Wealth inequality has never been funnier.

Inequality has gotten worse than you think.

An investigation by Hasan Minhaj of “The Daily Show” shows that the problem isn’t just your classic case of “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.”

As much as we hear about wealth inequality these days, one disparity remains mostly ignored: the gap between the wealthy and the ridiculously wealthy.

Minhaj spoke to Richard Reeves, an economist with the Brookings Institute, who painted a dark picture:

In the last two, three decades, we've seen a really striking increase in wealth inequality in America. This new study shows that within the top 1%, there is very, very wide inequality.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

The study Reeves refers to points to the growing wealth of the top 10th of the top 1%:

The rise of wealth inequality is almost entirely due to the rise of the top 0.1% wealth share, from 7% in 1979 to 22% in 2012 — a level almost as high as in 1929. The bottom 90% wealth share first increased up to the mid-1980s and then steadily declined.”

And no one’s paid any attention.

Between the cries of the 45.3 million people in poverty and a dwindling middle class in every state, the voice of the average millionaire is all but drowned out.

They need our help, right?

But not all millionaires are worried about growing inequality in the top 1%.

In his search for a concerned millionaire, Minhaj met Morris Pearl, a retired investment banking director and member of an organization called The Patriotic Millionaires. Minhaj was baffled by what Pearl had to say:

I do not need more money.

What about trickle-down economics?

Trickle-down theory was popularized under Ronald Reagan’s presidency. The idea was that clearing a path for the rich to make more money would spur more private investment, which would lead to more jobs and higher wages for all workers.

Reagan put trickle-down theory into practice in two basic ways: by lowering taxes for the wealthy and by freezing wages for the poor.

In 1981, he cut the top marginal income tax rate — which only applies to the highest-income households — from 70% to 50%. Then in 1986, he more than doubled-down by slashing the rate to 28%. (The current rate is 39.6%.) And under Reagan’s leadership, the minimum wage was frozen, even as costs of living were rising.

Pearl and other so-called Patriotic Millionaires think top one-percenters like themselves should pay more taxes.

Not only that, they believe raising the minimum wage is critical to reducing inequality.

OK, maybe not everyone — including millionaires — are convinced that giving more money to the rich will fix the economy. So why do our policies do just the opposite?

Original video by “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.” Follow Hasan Minhaj on Twitter.

A ‘Daily Show’ correspondent asks a millionaire about inequality and gets an unexpected response.

Wealth inequality has never been funnier.

Inequality has gotten worse than you think.

An investigation by Hasan Minhaj of “The Daily Show” shows that the problem isn’t just your classic case of “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.”

As much as we hear about wealth inequality these days, one disparity remains mostly ignored: the gap between the wealthy and the ridiculously wealthy.

Minhaj spoke to Richard Reeves, an economist with the Brookings Institute, who painted a dark picture:

In the last two, three decades, we've seen a really striking increase in wealth inequality in America. This new study shows that within the top 1%, there is very, very wide inequality.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

The study Reeves refers to points to the growing wealth of the top 10th of the top 1%:

The rise of wealth inequality is almost entirely due to the rise of the top 0.1% wealth share, from 7% in 1979 to 22% in 2012 — a level almost as high as in 1929. The bottom 90% wealth share first increased up to the mid-1980s and then steadily declined.”

And no one’s paid any attention.

Between the cries of the 45.3 million people in poverty and a dwindling middle class in every state, the voice of the average millionaire is all but drowned out.

They need our help, right?

But not all millionaires are worried about growing inequality in the top 1%.

In his search for a concerned millionaire, Minhaj met Morris Pearl, a retired investment banking director and member of an organization called The Patriotic Millionaires. Minhaj was baffled by what Pearl had to say:

I do not need more money.

What about trickle-down economics?

Trickle-down theory was popularized under Ronald Reagan’s presidency. The idea was that clearing a path for the rich to make more money would spur more private investment, which would lead to more jobs and higher wages for all workers.

Reagan put trickle-down theory into practice in two basic ways: by lowering taxes for the wealthy and by freezing wages for the poor.

In 1981, he cut the top marginal income tax rate — which only applies to the highest-income households — from 70% to 50%. Then in 1986, he more than doubled-down by slashing the rate to 28%. (The current rate is 39.6%.) And under Reagan’s leadership, the minimum wage was frozen, even as costs of living were rising.

Pearl and other so-called Patriotic Millionaires think top one-percenters like themselves should pay more taxes.

Not only that, they believe raising the minimum wage is critical to reducing inequality.

OK, maybe not everyone — including millionaires — are convinced that giving more money to the rich will fix the economy. So why do our policies do just the opposite?

Original video by “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.” Follow Hasan Minhaj on Twitter.

A ‘Daily Show’ correspondent asks a millionaire about inequality and gets an unexpected response.

Wealth inequality has never been funnier.

Inequality has gotten worse than you think.

An investigation by Hasan Minhaj of “The Daily Show” shows that the problem isn’t just your classic case of “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.”

As much as we hear about wealth inequality these days, one disparity remains mostly ignored: the gap between the wealthy and the ridiculously wealthy.

Minhaj spoke to Richard Reeves, an economist with the Brookings Institute, who painted a dark picture:

In the last two, three decades, we've seen a really striking increase in wealth inequality in America. This new study shows that within the top 1%, there is very, very wide inequality.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

The study Reeves refers to points to the growing wealth of the top 10th of the top 1%:

The rise of wealth inequality is almost entirely due to the rise of the top 0.1% wealth share, from 7% in 1979 to 22% in 2012 — a level almost as high as in 1929. The bottom 90% wealth share first increased up to the mid-1980s and then steadily declined.”

And no one’s paid any attention.

Between the cries of the 45.3 million people in poverty and a dwindling middle class in every state, the voice of the average millionaire is all but drowned out.

They need our help, right?

But not all millionaires are worried about growing inequality in the top 1%.

In his search for a concerned millionaire, Minhaj met Morris Pearl, a retired investment banking director and member of an organization called The Patriotic Millionaires. Minhaj was baffled by what Pearl had to say:

I do not need more money.

What about trickle-down economics?

Trickle-down theory was popularized under Ronald Reagan’s presidency. The idea was that clearing a path for the rich to make more money would spur more private investment, which would lead to more jobs and higher wages for all workers.

Reagan put trickle-down theory into practice in two basic ways: by lowering taxes for the wealthy and by freezing wages for the poor.

In 1981, he cut the top marginal income tax rate — which only applies to the highest-income households — from 70% to 50%. Then in 1986, he more than doubled-down by slashing the rate to 28%. (The current rate is 39.6%.) And under Reagan’s leadership, the minimum wage was frozen, even as costs of living were rising.

Pearl and other so-called Patriotic Millionaires think top one-percenters like themselves should pay more taxes.

Not only that, they believe raising the minimum wage is critical to reducing inequality.

OK, maybe not everyone — including millionaires — are convinced that giving more money to the rich will fix the economy. So why do our policies do just the opposite?

Original video by “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.” Follow Hasan Minhaj on Twitter.